Wellbeing Messages

Wellbeing Messages

The empower app has wellbeing messages for Psychosis, Anxiety and Coping Messages, Hope and Mood, Fear of Recurrence, Activity and Activation, Generic.

Psychosis Some people have told us that a pair of headphones and loud music can help on days when voices are bad. What do you find helps?
Some people have told us that compassionate responses to voices useful – for example saying “thank you but your input isn’t needed just now”. What do you find helps?
Some people have told us that getting upset with voices is counterproductive. Better to say “thank you but I don’t need your advice just now”. Could this work for you?
Using distraction for voices can be helpful like listening to music or watching TV. What do you find helpful to distract you?
Voices can be really intrusive and upsetting and some people have told us they negotiate a time to deal with voices. Could this help you get on with the things that are more important for you?
Some people have told us that checking in with a trusted person can help them cope with feelings of suspiciousness. Can you identify a person you can check in with?
A list of 60 strategies for coping with hallucinations from Best Practices in Schizophrenia Treatment (BeST) Center http://www.neomed.edu/academics/bestcenter/pdfs/list-of-60-coping-strategies-for-hallucinations.pdf
Some people find using Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) techniques helpful in managing psychosis and distress. Why not try this self help guide based on the principles of CBT. http://www.getselfhelp.co.uk/psychosis.htm
Some people have told us that compassionate responses to voices useful – for example saying “thank you but your input isn’t needed just now”. What do you find helps?
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Anxiety and Coping Messages Some people find that meditation is helpful for coping. Have you tried meditation?
Some people find mindfulness and relaxation exercise helpful for managing stress and anxiety. Why not try this short guided session which features breathing and relaxation exercises.
https://soundcloud.com/mentalhealthfoundation/mindfulness-10-
minute-practice
Some people have told us that establishing a daily routine helps them cope with worrying. What would you like your daily routine to be?
Sharing how you feel with someone can be really hard, take a lot of courage but can really help. Can you think of someone you could share your feelings with?
Feeling anxious can feel like a real strain: Take a minute to think with kindness how you are holding your body just now. Just being aware can help with relaxation.
People have said that scheduling a worry time each day can increase control and reduce stress: How about setting aside a time for worrying each day?
Worrying can feel uncontrollable: How about setting aside a time for worrying each day?
Don’t think about “beating” or “curing” anxiety. Think about living with it, alongside it, accepting it and thriving with it.
Worrying: sometimes a worry box might help. Write down your worries and post them in the box to deal with them later.
Worrying can stop you from getting to sleep. Use a worry box - write down your worries and post them in the box to deal with them tomorrow.
Taking control of your breathing can help us feel more control. Try this calming technique – get comfortable inhale for the count of 4, pause for the count of 2 and release for the count of 6
Take a moment to notice with kindness what your breathing is like. Is it fast and shallow? Try this calming technique – get comfortable inhale for the count of 4, pause for the count of 2 and release for the count of 6
Breathing out for longer than you breath in naturally relaxes your body. Try noticing with kindness your breathing
Sometimes worrying can be helpful – have you considered listing the advantages and disadvantages of worrying?
Sometimes we worry about things we have no control over………………
Are you interested in academic perspectives on coping with psychosis? If you are you might find this paper useful. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1790964/
pdf/nihms15632.pdf
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Hope and Mood When we feel down we can also experience judge ourselves harshly. Developing self-compassion can help us develop a feeling of kindness and warmth towards ourselves
Feeling down or depressed can make it hard to experience pleasure. How about trying to schedule one thing each day that could bring you enjoyment?
Developing self-acceptance can help counter feelings of self-criticism.
Adopting a kind and warm voice when talking with your self can help reduce feelings of self-criticism.
Thoughts and emotions that we experience can be upsetting. Realising these are experiences and not facts can help
Developing self-kindness and warmth can help reduce feelings of self-criticism
Learning isn’t possible with making mistakes. Remember to be kind to yourself if your feel you’ve made a mistake.
You’ve made it through tough times before – what has kept you going and what have you learned about overcoming adversity?
Start with your strengths first – keep a list of your strengths and notice these each day
What would you like to do (differently) today to determine your future?
Regardless of our vulnerabilities or problems we all have unique strengths. Take some time to consider your strengths
Developing a strengths list can help coping. If you find this hard, ask someone you trust to help you.
‘The bravest thing I ever did was continuing my life when I wanted to die.' Actress Juliette Lewis
‘The darkest hour has only sixty minutes.’ Journalist Morris Mandell. This will pass.
‘Sometimes, you know, it snows as late as May but summer always comes eventually.’ Eleanor Longden from here TED Talk video about overcoming psychosis: “The Voices in My Head” https://www.ted.com/talks/eleanor_longden_the_voices_in_my_head?language=en
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Fear of Recurrence The greatest glory in living lies not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall. Nelson Mandela.
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Activity and Activation
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Generic People can and do recover from mental health problems. What does recovery mean to you?
People can walk alongside you and support you in recovery but you can be in the driving seat. Have you considered your recovery goals?
Sometimes people worry about their medication. Remember you’re entitled to ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice.
It’s your right to know about your medications. Have you got all the information you need? If not speak to your doctor or pharmacist.
If you suffer from a dry mouth with your medication have you considered fake saliva or dry mouth spray? Ask your pharmacist for more information
Looking after your physical health is important mental health recovery. Have you seen your GP to talk about your physical health?
Looking after your physical health is important mental health recovery. Have you thought about opportunities for increasing physical exercise?
The secret of positive change is to focus your energy, not on fighting the old, but building the new
It's okay to be angry – use it to create positive change
Dealing with psychosis is a Canadian toolkit for ‘moving forward with your life’ http://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/workbook/dealing-with-
psychosis-a-toolkit-for-moving-forward-with-your-life
Watch or read about people’s experiences of psychosis with healthtalk.org. From coping and relationships to housing and spirituality.
http://www.healthtalk.org/peoples-experiences/mental-health/
experiences-psychosis/topics
Everyone has a story. Writing it down can help you in many different ways. Write to Recovery is a website from the Scottish Recovery Network where you are supported to share experiences in writing. You can also read what other people have written. http://www.writetorecovery.net/
‘In order to recover from psychosis you need a perspective of hope and possibility to change.’ Professor of Psychiatry, Jim van Os. Watch his short film ‘Five phases of recovery’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdiPK3-K5is
Reading about other people’s views and experiences of psychosis can be
interesting and informative. The journal Schizophrenia Bulletin shares articles written by people about their personal experiences of psychosis. http://oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/schbul/
firstpersonaccounts.html

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